Transfer Case Removal Issues

Hi, I am currently removing the engine from my ‘92 GTO VR4. I am using This guide This guide is for a ‘95 3000GT VR4. In the guide, the section for removing the transfer case is Here I have removed the five bolts as described in the guide, but the transfer case just refuses to come out. I have tried to remove it with a pinch bar, a screwdriver, a piece of metal box-section but it just wont budge. I am at a dead end here, and some help or advice would really be appreciated.

Hello,
Sliding off the case is done easily, like explained in the tutorial or/and service manual.
I removed the transfer case several times now and it went off at every occasion with no resistance.

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Do you have a 5 speed or 6 speed gearbox?
If you are able to upload a picture showing which bolts you’ve removed, we can help you to verify that all of them have been removed.

If the bolts are removed you should be able to wiggle the TC a little bit. If there is no gap at all, then something is still connected or you axle from the gearbox has melted into the sleeve in the TC :slight_smile:

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Hi, it’s a five speed transaxle. Here are some pictures of the bolts I removed. image image image image
One of the images is also showing the gap between the transfer case and the transmission that I have been able to achieve. If the transfer case was melted to the transmission, how would I go about removing the engine? Thanks for the help!

Melted to the gearbox was meant as a joke :slight_smile:
There is an axle from the gearbox going into the TC. It could be rusted to the sleeve in the TC, making it a bit harder to detach the TC.

You’re on the right track. All bolts seem to be removed correctly.
There should be 2 alignment pins going from the gearbox into the backside of the TC. It could be the case that they are corroded and got stuck as well. Since you’ve managed to get a gap, my guess is the aligntment pins are not your main issue. Its probably the axle being rusted to the sleeve.

Basicly what you need to do it to tap/hit, wiggle and bend until the TC comes loose.
If you are able to spray some rust disolvent fluid into a gap between the TC and the gearbox in the area where you have your bolts #1-3, that could help get both the alignment pins and the axle loose.

Use a some wood (to avoid damage to the TC) and a hammer and tap the TC from different angles. Do not hit the lid (with the text GETRAG), hit it from below/front.

You can probably detach the entire gearbox from the engine and drop it together with the TC, and then lift your engine. But you will be able to detach the TC, it’s just a matter of putting enough force and lubrication without damaging the aluminium casing.

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Thank you so much for all the tips and information, I will let you know how it goes!

Here is someone with the same issue as you.
There are some pictures showing how the axle from the gearbox has corroded and probably got stuck in the sleeve in the TC.

Good luck :slight_smile: Let us know if it still refuses to move!

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I got it off!! Thank you so much for your help!! It was badly rusted, just like you said! The transmission output shaft is worn and rusty, and when I moved the TC in certain ways a red/brown powder would come out, it looked like rust that had been ground down into a powder. Here are some pictures: image image
The wear looks pretty severe, do you think it is usable? The car has an indicated 132K kilometres.
Thanks again! :slight_smile:

WELL DONE! :slight_smile:

Whoa, yep, that explains it. The good side is that you will never have this experience again because it can be prevented with some simple lubrication. Next time you remove it for whatever reason the process will feel easy peasy :slight_smile:

Its a bit hard to judge the condition from this angle. Can you take a picture in the axle direction so we can see the shape of the splines? And also a picture showing the splines in the sleeve in the TC where this axle attaches?
The answer will depend on the condition of the splines in both the sleeve and on the axle. If one of them is significantly worn out, it will cause the other to wear out fast as well.

Oh, and also how you plan on driving the car. Is it stock or tuned and will it be driven hard?

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Hi, the car is stock apart from a stainless steel exhaust system, a HKS BOV, a HKS air filter/intake system and an EGR delete. All of this was done by the previous owners (I only got the car a few months ago). I am removing the engine to repair a bad bottom end knock. I don’t plan on driving the car hard. Here are the pictures of the splines: image image image image
Thank you!

Alright. Could you also show the splines of the input sleeve in the transfer case (the sleeve is where the rusted axle from the gearbox enters the transfer case)?

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Here: image image image

You are a great photographer :slight_smile:

Alright. My conclusion is that both the “output shaft” (axle from gearbox) and the transfer case input sleeve are worn out. This can be caused by several things but since you have the 25 spline version, which is stronger than the 18 spline version found in the early gen1 cars, it is most likely mainly due to the severe corrosion. Hard launches will also wear down splines, but this looks more like a “grinding wear” than a “brute force”. The end axle of your TC looks OK and does not need to be replaced.

From personal experience and other peoples experience, I would recommend replacing both the output shaft and the TC sleeve. Both of them are so worn out that if you replace one of them, the one you do not replace will cause rapid wear again.

There are after market shafts and sleeves which are harder than the original ones. But since you have the 25 spline version and don’t plan on dropping the [email protected] with a heavily tuned engine a regular strength shaft/sleeve will work just fine. https://www.rvengeperformance.com/ and https://www.3sx.com/ have a few options.

The good part is that both the output shaft (axle) and the sleeve are quite easy to replace. You will need a hydraulic press but there are guides available on how to do it.

If you drive the car before replacing them, be very careful if you start hearing a grinding sound or notice that you loose power similarly to when your clutch is worn out. This will indicate that your splines are completely worn out and that the the output shaft is slipping inside the TC sleeve. When this happens the VCU in the gearbox thinks that your rear wheels are loosing grip and is working to shift power to your front wheels. The transfer of power to the front wheels is reason you can still drive the car although it feels like your “clutch is slipping” and you have no power. DO NOT DRIVE THE CAR THIS WAY and if you cannot stop right away, be sure to drive very gentle. You will otherwise overload the VCU and damage it.
I have actually had this happen to me, and managed to drive gentle enough to save the VCU. Phew :slight_smile:

Best regards,
Victor

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Hi Victor,
Wow, ok. I need to have a think about all that. Thank you so much for all this information, you have been a massive help and I will let you know what I decide to do. I really appreciate all your help in this.
Thanks again,
Adam

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I’m no expert but those splines are definitely shot. They look about 50% gone to me. Noobi has been 100% correct in all of his assessments and I would also highly recommend https://www.rvengeperformance.com/ for parts and service, even though they are in the US. If you are on Facebook, Chris Behnken is the owner and is very helpful if you have any questions.

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Ok, thanks for the help!

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